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Photo#542296
Dibotryon morbosum or syn. Apiosporina morbosa (Black Knot) on Prunus virginiana (Chokecherry)

Dibotryon morbosum or syn. Apiosporina morbosa (Black Knot) on Prunus virginiana (Chokecherry)
Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (Brigantine), Atlantic County, New Jersey, USA
May 7, 2011
They may be from a previous year because there are many exit (or parasite entry) holes, and some are covered in lichen.

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Dibotryon morbosum or syn. Apiosporina morbosa (Black Knot) on Prunus virginiana (Chokecherry) Dibotryon morbosum or syn. Apiosporina morbosa (Black Knot) on Prunus virginiana (Chokecherry)

Moved
Moved from Unidentified Galls.
Apparently we didn't have one of these yet.

Host plant...
...appears to be Chokecherry (Prunus virginiana), which suggests to me that these are fungal galls known as Black Knot, afflicting many species of Prunus.

 
Agreed
I often see those holes in black knot fungi, and I haven't figured out yet what bug is responsible, but my first guess is they are exit holes of some kind of beetle. So far all I've found by breaking the galls open is:

 
Thanks!
Oh well, at least I know to not try and "raise" one to find the gall maker!

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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