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Photo#549562
Another Okanagana in Kouchibouguac National Park - Okanagana rimosa

Another Okanagana in Kouchibouguac National Park - Okanagana rimosa
Bridge on Kouchibouguac River along bicycle path, site of former covered bridge, Kent County, New Brunswick, Canada
July 21, 2011
-Is this O rimosa or canadensis or something else?

Heard singing about 15 ft up in a Sugar Maple. Exact GPS coordinates forthcoming.

Moved
Moved from Okanagana.

O. rimosa
Nice find!

 
Thanks again!
I was starting to suspect the same, as Dr Hamilton mentions O canadensis has a striking pattern on the venter, which on this specimen is quite evenly orange throughout. Also that O canadensis is more "boreal" in character, but the northern section of the park may well be boreal enough to qualify, so we are going to investigate up there in the coming weeks. As for T lyricen in the region, I have now seen the image in a book just recently published and it indeed closely resembles those images of T lyricen on Bug Guide. It was found in 2007 in Richibouctou, a village at the southern edge of Kouchibouguac National Park by Alexandre Brideau. This was reported in "Assessment of Species Diversity in the Atlantic Maritime Ecozone. 2011. Edited by: McAlpine D.F., and Smith I.M. NRC Research Press. Ottawa, Ontario". I know Alexandre Brideau and have met him once or twice. I will look him up and try to find out more about this intriguing record, and will also definitely be on the lookout for all cicadas from now on! I am also learning my Cicada calls as we speak!

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