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Photo#55061
Broad-tipped Conehead Stridulating - Neoconocephalus triops - male

Broad-tipped Conehead Stridulating - Neoconocephalus triops - Male
Parkwood, Durham County, North Carolina, USA
May 31, 2006
This conehead has been stridulating very loudly the last few nights from some low bushes next to my yard. The singing starts when it gets really dark, say 9:30 p.m. I finally caught him in the act last night. I see why, perhaps, he was not quite so wary--he's missing a leg and his wing tips. Perhaps he's on a program of "mate or die trying"!

(A few nights later I came upon a potential predator. While attempting to stalk another singing male with my camera, I startled a large black cat, apparently stalking the same conehead by ear.)

I believe this is the only Neoconocephalus singing now in my area. The adults of this species overwinter, and sing starting in April. The song is an ear-splitting buzz, reminding me of the hum of a defective electrical transformer. The song really stands out against the softer calls of various crickets and tree-crickets, which are the only other nocturnal insects I have been hearing calling lately.