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Photo#564812
queen with red abdomen - Carebara longii - male - female

queen with red abdomen - Carebara longii - Male Female
Austin, Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center, Travis County, Texas, USA
August 18, 2011
Size: female about 8 mm
I've seen these distinctively colored queens several times so they are not uncommon. This particular female was found mating with a male, which then detached and flew away. A small jumping spider attacked the female, but she managed to repel it. Then another male mated with this same female. Busy lady.

Images of this individual: tag all
queen with red abdomen - Carebara longii - male - female queen with red abdomen - Carebara longii - female queen with red abdomen - Carebara longii - female queen with red abdomen - Carebara longii - male - female queen with red abdomen - Carebara longii - male

Moved
Nice find, and a new genus and species for the guide. Please collect and preserve some in a reputable insect collection.

Very interesting - but quite puzzling
Distinctively colored, yes, but quite tricky to tell even at the subfamily. At first I thought this might be a pair of Proceratium sp., but neither wing venation nor shape of the female's gaster match.
Hopefully a North-American species will have the answer.

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