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Photo#565170
Spider - Wagneriana tauricornis - male - female

Spider - Wagneriana tauricornis - Male Female
Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida, USA
August 19, 2011
Size: approx. 5 mm
9 am in my back yard. The net was suspended over a distance of about 1 m. I assume the first photo shows a female and a male of the same species. It was breezy and hence somewhat difficult to take these photos.

Images of this individual: tag all
Spider - Wagneriana tauricornis - male - female Spider - Wagneriana tauricornis - male - female Spider - Wagneriana tauricornis - male - female Spider - Wagneriana tauricornis

Moved
Moved from Wagneriana.

Moved
Moved from Spiders.

Wagneriana
Moved from ID Request.

If this is a Wagneriana sp., then the only one it could be is W. tauricornis. It matches OK to Levi 1991, but I'd like to think about it before creating a new guide page. The bumps on the anterior portion of the abdomen appear to be pointing in a different direction than Levi's drawings. He also doesn't show the white make on the posterior of the abdomen.

Edit: It matches a little better to Levi 1976.

Makes us think of Wagneriana.
Lynette, is there a Wagneriana in Florida? Not near our books.

 
Thanks
... that would be awesome. I found the following on Wagneriana in J. H Comstock Spider Book (Doubleday: Garden City, New York, 1912, pp. 460) via google:

"The abdomen is armed with prominent humps both in front and behind, but lacks the median hump at the base characteristic of Marxia. The posterior median eyes are much closer to each other than to the posterior lateral eyes. The tibiae of the first in the female (Fig. 473) than in the male. In the male the shoulder humps are single instead of bifid, and there is a single lateral one instead of three as in the female. There are four apical humps in the male and five in the female. This species is found in the southern portions of the United States, and its range extends through Central America. I studied this spider at Miami, Fla., and noted that it held its legs closely folded when hanging in its web; and that when in this position, it appeared like a bit of dirt."

... but then the little yellow spider would not be the male, or would it?

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