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Species Epicauta temexa

Epicauta temexa Adams & Selander - Epicauta temexa Epicauta temexa Adams & Selander - Epicauta temexa Epicauta temexa Adams & Selander - Epicauta temexa Epicauta temexa Adams & Selander - Epicauta temexa Epicauta temexa Adams & Selander - Epicauta temexa Epicauta temexa Adams and Selander - Epicauta temexa
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
No Taxon (Series Cucujiformia)
Superfamily Tenebrionoidea (Fungus, Bark, Darkling and Blister Beetles)
Family Meloidae (Blister Beetles)
Subfamily Meloinae
Tribe Epicautini
Genus Epicauta
No Taxon (subgenus Epicauta)
No Taxon (Vittata Group)
Species temexa (Epicauta temexa)
Explanation of Names
Epicauta temexa Adams & Selander 1979
temexa, from Texas and Mexico(1)
Size
10-15 mm(1)
Range
OK-TX to Veracruz, Mexico(1)(BG data); NM & LA records need verification
Season
Mar-Nov(1)
Food
Pigweed (Amaranthus) is utilized as a food source by adults much more frequently than either nightshade (Solanum) or alfalfa (Medicago)(1)
Life Cycle
Reared females lived 40-158 days. Females laid ~23 eggs per day. Females can reproduce parthenogenetically. Adults are active nocturnally: "In southern Texas [...] we had difficulty collecting adults of E. temexa and E. occidentalis in the day, even at localities where they swarmed at lights in large numbers at night. Some of the most effective collecting was done by locating patches of Amaranthus or Solanum under street or farm lights during the day and returning at night, at which time the beetles crawl to the top of the vegetation to feed and carry on other activities. It was possible, of course, to find adults in these patches during the day, but only with difficulty, since they remained near the ground and were relatively inactive."(1)
See Also
Epicauta occidentalis is narrowly sympatric with E. temexa from east Texas to Brownsville(1)
Works Cited
1.The biology of blister beetles of the vittata group of the genus Epicauta (Coleoptera, Meloidae).
Adams and Selander. 1979. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 162(4): 137-266.