Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
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Upcoming Events

Discussion of 2018 gathering

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington


Species Icerya purchasi - Cottony Cushion Scale

Cottony Cushion Scale? - Icerya purchasi Cottony Cushion Scale (Adult / Nympth) - Icerya purchasi Icerya purchasi Cottony cushion scale - Icerya purchasi - male - female Cottony cushion scale - Icerya purchasi - male - female Cottony Cushion Scale - Icerya purchasi unknown bug 2 - Icerya purchasi tiny insects? on scales - Icerya purchasi
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Sternorrhyncha (Plant-parasitic Hemipterans)
Superfamily Coccoidea (Scales and Mealybugs)
Family Monophlebidae (Giant Scale Insects)
Genus Icerya
Species purchasi (Cottony Cushion Scale)
Other Common Names
Fluted Scale, Australian Bug, Australian Mealybug
Explanation of Names
Icerya purchasi Maskell 1878
s US and up the Atlantic seaboard (BG data); native to Australia
Hosts include many plants, though in FL Citrus and Pittosporum (Pittosporaceae) are most commonly affected - UF
The white fluted part of the insect is an egg sac that can contain up to 1000 eggs. The insect is hermaphroditic, producing sperm that can fertilize its own ova, but in an alternate reproductive strategy it can also make winged males that can fertilize the female part of other individuals.
When it first appeared in the w. US it was a major pest of Citrus crops. In CA, around 1889, it was an early success story for biological control by beneficial ladybird beetles (Rodolia cardinalis). (Full story) The control was so successful that in 1893 a Florida nurseryman asked for some of the beneficials to be sent to FL, to test as a control for other scale insects. The scale was included in the shipment as food for the beetles, and thus accidentally introduced to FL citrus.
Internet References
Featured Creatures - Hamon & Fasulo 2005