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Photo#581352
Aphid type Bug on Sweet Alyssum, Lobularia maritima - Leptoglossus

Aphid type Bug on Sweet Alyssum, Lobularia maritima - Leptoglossus
Skidaway Island, Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia, USA
September 26, 2011
Aphid type bug on Sweet Alyssum, Lobularia maritima

Images of this individual: tag all
Aphid type Bug on Sweet Alyssum, Lobularia maritima - Leptoglossus Aphid type Bug on Sweet Alyssum, Lobularia maritima - Leptoglossus

Moved
Moved from True Bugs.

Virtually identical to multiple Guide images identified by experts as Leptoglossus.

 
Ken- thank you for having pro
Ken- thank you for having provided the genus, Leptoglossus.

I appreciate the time you expend supporting those of us who submit our digital captures for ID.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

They look
like assassin bug nymphs, Fitz. Not sure which species. Pselliopus or Sinea maybe.

 
antennal design rules out assassin bugs
these are coreid nymphs, something like Leptoglossus

 
I am no expert by far so I ma
I am no expert by far so I may be wrong but I think the Coreidae nymphs like Leptoglossus have the flattened back legs like the adults. I have seem these nymphs in the same areas as Coreidae adults and nymphs though. possibly in the superfamily Coreoidea though at least if its not an assassin bug nymph.

 
among Heteroptera,
...early instar nymphs tend to look very different from the later instars; abundant examples of immature Leptoglossus here.
btw, hints of the metatibial flanges can be seen here as well.

 
Thank you for delivering me t
Thank you for delivering me to the coreid nymph stage. I will continue to follow this group with updated images.

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