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Photo#582306
Southeastern Field Cricket - Gryllus rubens - female

Southeastern Field Cricket - Gryllus rubens - Female
Albany, Dougherty County, Georgia, USA
September 25, 2011
Size: 20 mm
Gryllus rubens - Eastern Trilling Cricket
Found in the morning on a wall in a field habitat near the Flint River. It probably came to lights. It attracted my attention because it looked like it would sit relatively still for photos, which it did. The hind leg was already missing before I arrived. Otherwise, she seemed fine. Length of 20mm was body only.

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Southeastern Field Cricket - Gryllus rubens - female Southeastern Field Cricket - Gryllus rubens - female Southeastern Field Cricket - Gryllus rubens - female Southeastern Field Cricket - Gryllus rubens - female Southeastern Field Cricket - Gryllus rubens - female

Certainly looks like that species,
but there are others very similar. Just curious how you arrived at the ID (were there singing males around too?).

Moved from ID Request.

 
Thanks David,
Generally, I get my information from Capinera's, et al. Field Guide and use it in conjuction with the University of Florida site, Singing Insects of North America.
From those sources, I used range and habitat to narrow down the list of suspects. At this location, I had to be most concerned with Gryllus rubens, G. texensis, and G. firmus. G. veletis and G. pennsylvanicus occur much further north. This habitat was a large open lawn / park and I wasn't hearing any wood crickets.
I heard what I believed was G. rubens. I keep Himmelman's CD in my truck, but G. rubens and texensis are not on it, but G. firmus is (which I definitely was not hearing). I listened to all the suspects and more on Singing Insects of North America. I was most concerned with the very similar G. texensis (like G. rubens, a trilling cricket), but I have not heard G. texensis in this area and the range maps I've seen, put G. texensis a little more to the southwest and west of here.

 
That has got to be one of the most detailed explanations
I've seen! Not that different from how I'd do it, except I don't use the Field Guide, and I do like Blatchley's old book (even though a little bit of name updating has to be done). This (on line at the U of F web sight) is useful too, but outdated, and some are missing from it: Taxonomy of the Field Crickets of the Eastern United States.

I have seen most of these species before, so have a little familiarity with most, and a lot with some, which also helps. I think you've definitely got it to a "most likely" candidate, though as is often true with female Orthops (and nearly all Gryllus ID'd from photos), there will remain a little bit of doubt. I think we can leave it where it is, since it really does look like what it probably is. Thanks

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