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Tribe Aedini

 
 
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Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti in the continental United States: a vector at the cool margin of its geographic range.
By Eisen L, Moore CG.
Journal of Medical Entomology 50(3): 467-78., 2013
Full Text

Eisen L, Moore CG. 2013. Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti in the continental United States: a vector at the cool margin of its geographic range. Journal of Medical Entomology 50(3): 467-78.

U.S. range of Ae. aegypti

Counties in the continental United States with collection records of Ae. aegypti from 1986 to 2010 (shaded red), based on information from a database for invasive mosquito species curated by C. G. Moore of Colorado State University.

Effects of temperature and larval diet on development rates and survival of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti in north Queensland.
By Tun-Lin et al.
Medical and Veterinary Entomology 14(1): 31–37., 2000
Abstract

W. Tun-Lin, T.R. Burkot and B.H. Kay. 2000. Effects of temperature and larval diet on development rates and survival of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti in north Queensland, Australia. Medical and Veterinary Entomology 14(1): 31–37.

Immature development times, survival rates and adult size (wing-lengths) of the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) were studied in the laboratory at temperatures of 10–40°C. The duration of development from egg eclosion (hatching of the first instar) to adult was inversely related to temperature, ranging from 7.2 ± 0.2 days at 35°C to 39.7 ± 2.3 days at 15°C. The minimum temperature threshold for development (t) was determined as 8.3 ± 3.6°C and the thermal constant (K) was 181.2 ± 36.1 day-degrees above the threshold. Maximum survival rates of 88–93% were obtained between 20 and 30°C. Wing-length was inversely related to temperature. The sex ratio (♀:♂) was 1 : 1 at all temperatures tested (15, 20, 25 and 35°C) except 30°C (4 : 3).

Effects of different temperature regimens on the development of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes.
By Mohammed, A., and D.D. Chadee.
Acta Tropica 119: 38–43., 2011
Full PDF

Azad Mohammed, Dave D. Chadee. 2011. Effects of different temperature regimens on the development of Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes. Acta Tropica 119: 38–43.

This study was conducted to determine the effects of increased water temperatures on the development of Aedes aegypti immatures under laboratory conditions in Trinidad, West Indies using temperature regulated water baths to cover a range of temperatures from 24–25◦C to 34–35◦C at a relative humidity of 80%.

Pandemic dengue in Caribbean countries and the southern United States — Past, present and potential problems.
By Ehrenkranz et al.
The New England Journal of Medicine 285: 1460-1469., 1971
N Engl J Med

N. Joel Ehrenkranz, M.D., Arnoldo K. Ventura, Ph.D., Raul R. Cuadrado, Dr.P.H., William L. Pond, Ph.D., and John E. Porter, Ph.D. 1971. Pandemic Dengue in Caribbean Countries and the Southern United States — Past, Present and Potential Problems. The New England Journal of Medicine 285: 1460-1469.

THE outbreaks of dengue in the Caribbean area in 1963–64 and 1968–691 have served as reminders of the continuing presence of dengue in the Western Hemisphere, and the threat of recurrence of epidemic dengue in the southern United States.

Dengue and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever.
By Gubler, D.J.
Clinical Microbiology Reviews 11(3): 480–496., 1998
Full Text

Gubler, D.J. 1998. Dengue and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever. Clinical Microbiology Reviews 11(3): 480–496.

Abstract
Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic regions. In 1998 this mosquito-borne disease is the most important tropical infectious disease after malaria, with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually. The reasons for this resurgence and emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the waning years of the 20th century are complex and not fully understood, but demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure changes in the past 30 years have contributed greatly.

Aedes aegypti in a Texas coastal county as an index of dengue fever receptivity and control.
By Micks DW, Moon WB.
The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 29(6): 1382-1388., 1980
Micks DW, Moon WB. 1980. Aedes aegypti in a Texas coastal county as an index of dengue fever receptivity and control. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 29(6): 1382-1388.

Abstract
Since Galveston County, Texas, is one of the high risk areas for the reintroduction of dengue, we have maintained an Aedes aegypti surveillance program since 1977 by using ovitraps to determine the density and distribution of this species in 17 communities. A. aegypti adults were present primarily from May through November...

[url=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6160

Zika Virus in Gabon (Central Africa) – 2007: A New Threat from Aedes albopictus?
By Grard et al.
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 8(2): e2681., 2014
Full Text (edited version below)

Grard et al. 2014. Zika Virus in Gabon (Central Africa) – 2007: A New Threat from Aedes albopictus? PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 8(2): e2681.

Background

Chikungunya and dengue viruses emerged in Gabon in 2007, with large outbreaks primarily affecting the capital Libreville and several northern towns. Both viruses subsequently spread to the south-east of the country, with new outbreaks occurring in 2010. The mosquito species Aedes albopictus, that was known as a secondary vector for both viruses, recently invaded the country and was the primary vector involved in the Gabonese outbreaks. We conducted a retrospective study of human sera and mosquitoes collected in Gabon from 2007 to 2010, in order to identify other circulating arboviruses.

Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse): a potential vector of Zika virus in Singapore.
By Wong et al.
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 7(8): e2348., 2013
PubMed

Wong PS, Li MZ, Chong CS, Ng LC, Tan CH. 2013. Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse): a potential vector of Zika virus in Singapore. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 7(8): e2348.

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Zika virus (ZIKV) is a little known arbovirus until it caused a major outbreak in the Pacific Island of Yap in 2007. Although the virus has a wide geographic distribution, most of the known vectors are sylvatic Aedes mosquitoes from Africa where the virus was first isolated. Presently, Ae. aegypti is the only known vector to transmit the virus outside the African continent, though Ae. albopictus has long been a suspected vector. Currently, Ae. albopictus has been shown capable of transmitting more than 20 arboviruses and its notoriety as an important vector came to light during the recent chikungunya pandemic. The vulnerability of Singapore to emerging infectious arboviruses has stimulated our interest to determine the competence of local Ae. albopictus to transmit ZIKV.

 
 
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