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"Green Group" of Questionable ID - (incl. "Odd Geographic Variants" & "Suspected Blend Zones/Interspecific Hybrids???")

Tibicen sp. (nr. linnei ... pruinosus x linnei ?) - Neotibicen - male Cicada? - Neotibicen Tibicen sp.? - Neotibicen - male tibicen. - Neotibicen - male Tibicen linnei - Neotibicen - male Large insect - Neotibicen Neotibicen? - Neotibicen Blacksburg Bug - Neotibicen
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hemiptera (True Bugs, Cicadas, Hoppers, Aphids and Allies)
Suborder Auchenorrhyncha (Free-living Hemipterans)
Superfamily Cicadoidea (Cicadas, Leafhoppers, and Treehoppers)
Family Cicadidae (Cicadas)
Subfamily Cicadinae
Genus Neotibicen (Annual or Dogday Cicadas)
No Taxon "Green Group" of Questionable ID - (incl. "Odd Geographic Variants" & "Suspected Blend Zones/Interspecific Hybrids???")
Identification
"Green Tibicen Species"
Collectively, yet informally, referred to as the "Green Tibicen species" (per. comm.), the following cicadas are often difficult to differentiate and all appear to be very closely related. Genitalic analysis of the males suggest these species are very closely related and morphological differences between and among the species can be slight and often overlap.

Some populations morphologically identified as "canicularis", "linnei" &/or "pruinosus" often reveal skewed (potentially overlapping) morphological characters & unexpected calls & call variations. Both call and morphology are commonly used to id cicadas; however, when the two collide to produce anomalous and often conflicting id's, pic's alone cannot be assigned with 100% certainty. We do know that some geographic areas seem to be home for several of these difficult groups and pic's from those areas may be "pigeon holed" here until....

It is also thought (based on observations) that several of these may be involved in complex hybrid zones; however, more work is needed to substantiate and better understand these observations.
Tibicen pruinosus pruinosus var. fulvus Beamer 1924 [syn. T. pruinosa var. fulva], "Pale Scissor(s) Grinder Cicada"

YOUTUBE videos of strange calls (Some of these calls seem to transition between linnei & pruinosus ?).
There is still some debate as to the audal (call) variations possible between and among populations of conspecifics and additional studies are needed to confirm and qualify these observations. However, despite needed studies involving call varaitions within a taxon, there are examples suggestive of more complex scenarios involving gene exchange between and among taxa. In conversation with a couple cicada specialists, both of whom have sampled this region & concur, there is something unusual in the calls & morphology for many of these populations. Thus far, DNA sampling & comparison methods have been inconclusive; however, there remains little doubt that some of these populations are likely composed of interspecific crosses.
Remarks
There are several regions across the eastern US where ambiguous Tibicen taxa occur. These populations are often characterized by intermediate morphological traits (between & among species) and aberrent calls - which may be intermediate as well.

Since species id is often difficult in these areas, individual cicadas from such populations are best placed here until additional studies have resolved the questions presented.

Suspected "hybrid populations" have been reported across the upper Mid-South, Mid-West & Mid-Atlantic States.
These suspected HYBRID combinations incl, but are not limited to the following:
Tibicen pruinosus x winnemanna (likely conspecific representing a cline)
T. linnei x winnemanna
T. linnei x pruinosus
T. linnei x canicularis
T. canicularis x pruinosus
T. robinsonianus x pruinosus (?)
T. latifasciatus x winnemanna (?)

INCIDENTALS
Florida (Southeast)
Tibicen davisi x similaris (?)
Gulf States (AL, MS, TN, LA, AR)
Tibicen davisi/harnedi x auriferus (?)

Spurious observations & reports of anomalous cicadas - i.e. "possible hybrids" - containing traits of the following in various combinations (per. comm.):
Tibicen resh x ?????
Tibicen pronotalis X ??? (pruinosus)
Tibicen tibicen (chloromerus) x ????
See Also
"Green Tibicen Species"
Collectively, yet informally, referred to as the "Green Tibicen species" (per. comm.), the following cicadas are often difficult to differentiate and all appear to be very closely related. Genitalic analysis of the males suggest these species are very closely related and morphological differences between and among the species are slight. It is also thought (based on observations) that several of these may be involved in complex hybrid zones; however, more work is needed to substantiate and better understand these observations.
Tibicen pruinosus pruinosus var. fulvus Beamer 1924 [syn. T. pruinosa var. fulva], "Pale Scissor(s) Grinder Cicada"

"Southern Dog-day Cicadas"
Loosely & informally referred to as the "Southern Dog-day Cicadas" (suggested - Reynolds 2010), the following taxa are mostly "southern" in distribution and appear to be closely related. These cicadas share several traits, incl. elongated opercula in the males, rapid trill and/or clicking calls, and unusually wide heads relative to body dimension (head widths usu. exceed thoracic widths).
(*appears to be the most divergent member within this group - ??)