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Photo#586981
Walkingsticks (Phasmida)? - Timema californicum - male - female

Walkingsticks (Phasmida)? - Timema californicum - Male Female
Big Basin Redwoods State Park, Pine Mountain, Santa Cruz County, California, USA
June 25, 2011
We had been hiking up the mountain when Kurt noticed these hitchhikers were using his jacket as a motel room.

I've a lot of images, please frass any unneeded ones.

Images of this individual: tag all
Walkingsticks (Phasmida)? - Timema californicum - male - female Walkingsticks (Phasmida)? - Timema californicum - male - female Walkingsticks (Phasmida)? - Timema californicum - male - female Walkingsticks (Phasmida)? - Timema californicum - male - female Walkingsticks (Phasmida)? - Timema californicum - male - female Walkingsticks (Phasmida)? - Timema californicum - male - female Walkingsticks (Phasmida)? - Timema californicum - male - female Walkingsticks (Phasmida)? - Timema californicum - male - female

Moved
Moved from Timema.

(See comments on 4th image in this series for details on the species ID and move.)

Indeed they are Walkinsticks
Albeit somewhat unusual ones. There are a number of species described in this genus, and I'm not up to date on them, so I'm not certain of the species. However, these would seem to fit T. californica quite nicely. All the different angles make identification easier, and luckily the male isn't clasped to the female, so his cerci are clearly visible (the shape of which are important). There is one view that almost nobody ever gets though, and sometimes it's useful - the under side.

Moved from ID Request.

 
we tried
to flip them over but they wouldn't stay that way long enough for the camera to focus, but at least we finally got them off of Kurt's jacket.

On 5/9/09 and 5/23/10 I also had photos of these in the same area, (within .5 miles on the same trail)one of the others was also on a dark piece of clothing, so maybe that's a way to attract them?

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