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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#58763
small bug - Pycnoderes medius

small bug - Pycnoderes medius
Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia, USA
June 17, 2006
Size: ~4 to 5 mm

Images of this individual: tag all
small bug - Pycnoderes medius small bug - Pycnoderes medius

Moved
Moved from Pycnoderes.

I'd vote for P. medius.
P. medius is very similar to P. dilatatus, but this bug has no apical pale spot on embolium, its legs are pale except for front coxae and apical half of femora, and membrane and veins are dark except for apical margins.

Moved
Moved to genus page. I just ID'd a similar specimen so genus should be the same. Probably P. dilatatus but hard to be sure.

We found an image of
Merragata hebroides here that looks like it might be similar. It is supposed to be very small 2mm or so. Anyone know what M.brunnea looks like? Here's the ITIS page.

 
Thanks...
for the help. I found a slightly blurry image of M. brunnea at this site:

http://floridabenthos.org/Assets/Gallery/pages/Merragata%20brunnea.htm

 
Miridae.
The references being made here seem to apply to one of the lygaeids? This specimen is a mirid of some kind, so distinctive it should be easily identified at some point. Fantastic images.

 
Miridae
Thanks for the help and the compliment on the photos.

 
Guess it still looks too small
Maybe we'll see if there is something else in that family that it might be. We'll keep looking too.

 
Thanks
for all your help.

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