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Photo#58778
They've got horns - Enchenopa on-ptelea

They've got horns - Enchenopa on-ptelea
Bunker Hill Forest Preserve, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA
June 14, 2006
Size: ~3mm
They're pushing 3 mm in size and they're growing a horn. Still no sign of any green on the abdomen.

Images of this individual: tag all
They've got horns - Enchenopa on-ptelea They've got horns - Enchenopa on-ptelea

Re: Enchenopa ptelea
Those are really neat-looking! Never seen anything like it before.

 
Enchenopa nymphs
These ones are unusual in having that white stripe down the back contrasting with mottled, dark sides to the abdomen. Others with the white stripe (only on walnuts) have black abdomens with bold white markings. The ones on black walnut has a different pattern than the one on butternut. Watch for them, they are really cute!

 
We've been taking a series of images
this year of the nymphs of this species of Enchenopa for Dr Hamilton. Apparently scientists know that there is a species of Enchenopa that feeds on Ptelea, but it has not yet been described in the literature, so it doesn't even have a name. The adults apparently all look alike, but the nymphs of all the Enchenopa species are different! They are strange little dinosaurs!

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