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Photo#588895
Camel Cricket - Ceuthophilus maculatus - female

Camel Cricket - Ceuthophilus maculatus - Female
Canton, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, USA
October 20, 2011
Size: 18.5mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Camel Cricket - Ceuthophilus maculatus - female Camel Cricket - Ceuthophilus maculatus - female Camel Cricket - Ceuthophilus maculatus - female

Moved
Moved from Ceuthophilus.

Seems to be a Ceuthophilus
I tried to figure out the species, but couldn't. If you have a photo from a lower angle that shows the teeth that are along the lower side of the ovipositor, it might be possible. If I ever manage to learn them better without having to count teeth, that will help too - but I'm not there.

Moved from Camel Crickets.

 
Close up added
Hopefully this shows enough of what you need to see. If not, I can take another picture.

 
That is wonderful
I should wait to comment until I have time to try and identify her (probably this evening), but I want to point out the "teeth" that show through (due to the back-lighting) near the end of the ovipositor. They are on the inner valves of the ovipositor and often completely hidden. I'm glad they show, often you need to physically expose them, and it's hard to do that and photograph at the same time (especially if the insect is alive and squirming). Location and those teeth may be enough to identify her. Sometimes the shape and placement of the sternites and tergites near the tip of the abdomen are important (but that applies more to males).

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