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Photo#589418
Pepsinae with yellow antennae - Hemipepsis toussainti - female

Pepsinae with yellow antennae - Hemipepsis toussainti - Female
Madrone Ranger Station, Rincon Mts, Pima County, Arizona, USA
October 22, 2011
Size: Small to medium pepsis

Images of this individual: tag all
Pepsinae with yellow antennae - Hemipepsis toussainti - female Pepsinae with yellow antennae - Hemipepsis toussainti - female Pepsinae with yellow antennae - Hemipepsis toussainti - female

Moved
Moved from Entypus unifasciatus californicus.

Very sorry!!!!
Aaron, Thank you for helping me with this. I should have asked you about this first.

 
No problem...you clearly meant well!
I can empathize with the error...it can be difficult to make a call on Entypus vs. Hemipepsis! It took me a while to get it right on the post below (and I had help from others):

   

Many of us learn from our mistakes (I know I do...sometimes it's the only way I learn! :-).

Moved
Moved from Entypus unifasciatus.

This subspecies should be restricted to California. I will check the keys and update you, if needed.

 
Bob, I think this is indeed Hemipepsis toussainti
Upon careful examination of the full-size version of the 2nd image in this series (especially the upper wing) it appears the 1st recurrent vein meets the 2nd submarginal cell significantly beyond the distal 1/4 point of its length from its distal end, and closer to the distal 1/10 or so of the posterior edge of the 2nd submarginal cell. So this does appear to be Hemipepsis.

Then, using Townes(1) key to Hemipepsis, the orange antennae of this female, and the separation of the lateral ocellus from the eye by about 3.5 times its diameter...as well as the Tucson location...all strongly indicate H. toussainti.

As you noted, Entypus unifasciatus californicus is not known from outside CA. Also, in both males and females of that taxon, the hind wing venation has the terminal ends of the nervullus and cubitella nearly opposite one another, whereas in Margarethe's 3rd image here the nervellus ends significantly distal to the cubitella (see Fig. 1A on pg. 7 of Townes(1) for a labelled reference diagram indicating vein terminology here).

Compare both the position of the 1st recurrent vein along the posterior edge of the 2nd submarginal, and the ends of the nervellus and cubitella in Margarethe's 2nd and 3rd images here with those in Robyn's images of E. u. californicus below:

       

Moved
Moved from Hemipepsis toussainti.

10 flagellomeres = ♀
Her wing-tips are damaged and the dark band is missing.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Cool!
My wild guess is Hemipepsis toussainti, but I'm really anxious to see what Nick Fensler says....Some neat finds on the Bioblitz, eh?

 
Thanks, Eric
according to the UAIC it looks good

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