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Photo#591635
Keroplatus, end of abdomen - dorsal - Keroplatus militaris - male

Keroplatus, end of abdomen - dorsal - Keroplatus militaris - Male
Plymouth Rock, Winneshiek County, Iowa, USA
August 4, 2008
Size: 8- mm

Images of this individual: tag all
Keroplatus perhaps, dorsal-lateral - Keroplatus militaris - male Keroplatidae, antennae - Keroplatus militaris - male Keroplatidae - ventral - Keroplatus militaris - male Keroplatus, thorax - dorsal - Keroplatus militaris - male Keroplatidae - thorax - Keroplatus militaris - male Keroplatus, end of abdomen - dorsal - Keroplatus militaris - male Keroplatidae, terminalia, - lateral - Keroplatus militaris - male

Moved
Moved from Keroplatus.

Not sure
Fisher did not illustrate both species' terminalia from a lateral aspect, and this is not entirely dorsal so perspective may be misleading. I expect somebody familiar with both species could tell; I can't.

 
Probably Keroplatus militaris.
I've seen Keroplatus militaris, K. clausus and K. carbonarius in person. This is not K. carbornarius because the antennae of that species are distinctive in their apical banding. K. clausus has much shorter claspers; likewise to K. terminalis which is a western species (seen in a photograph here: http://keroplatidae.wikispot.org/Keroplatus_terminalis). Fisher could not distinguish between the genetalia of the two, but Loic Matile (1990) provided more than adequate illustrations.

This is probably K. militaris (if not an undescribed species), since the claspers are distinctive for being long and pointed. This is clear in both Elizabeth Fisher's 1941 illustrations and in Matile's book on Keroplatidae. Great photos btw!

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