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Photo#593253
Muscoid fly - Atherigona reversura - female

Muscoid fly - Atherigona reversura - Female
Rotonda West, Charlotte County, Florida, USA
June 10, 2011
Size: 3 mm
Collected a number of these, both males and females, at UV light. Six were collected on this date.

I think it may be Atherigona sp. (or something similar). It doesn't look quite like the one species of Atherigona (A. orientalis) listed for nearctic in (1) based on comparison to images on the web.

Edit: I see that another species, Atherigona reversura, has been reported from Georgia and Florida. I wonder if this could be it.

Images of this individual: tag all
Muscoid fly - Atherigona reversura - female Muscoid fly - Atherigona reversura - female Muscoid fly - Atherigona reversura - female

Moved
Moved from Shoot Flies. ID'd by Dr. Cecil Smith, Georgia Museum of Natural History, University of Georgia. His comment: "...definitely A. reversura Villeneuve. This thing seems to be spreading amazingly fast since the first specimens were sent to me a little more than a year ago."

Moved
Moved from Muscoidea. Genus confirmed on diptera.info (hopefully I placed this genus within the correct subfamily)

 
Phaoniinae
I moved it to Phaoniinae, which seems to be the prevailing view among sources that put it in an established subfamily. Some authorities give it its own subfamily and it could be moved to be a direct child of Muscidae (no point in making a monotypic subfamily node).

 
Thanks John.
I dropped an email to Will Hudson at UofGA to see if he recognizes this one.

How many dorsocentrals?
How many pre- and post-sutural dorsocentrals? Might be 3+4 but I'm not sure.

 
Hard to make out
so I'm not sure

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