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Photo#593372
Brown and translucent orange syrphid with curvy wing veins - Eristalis tenax

Brown and translucent orange syrphid with curvy wing veins - Eristalis tenax
Española, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, USA
November 8, 2011
Size: ~17 mm long
I'll move it to Syrphidae in a day or so, but I thought more people interested in the translucency (in the second image) would see it here. Since my porch faces east, I occasionally see flies with translucent markings like this in the mornings. Is this common? Does it indicate anything about the integument or viscera?

This fly was very sluggish on frosty mornings. I don't think its chances are good, as there are no flowers left around here.

The screen mesh is 1/16 inch.

Images of this individual: tag all
Brown and translucent orange syrphid with curvy wing veins - Eristalis tenax Brown and translucent orange syrphid with curvy wing veins - Eristalis tenax Brown and translucent orange syrphid with curvy wing veins - Eristalis tenax

Moved
Moved from Drone Fly.

 
Thanks.
I think my size estimate was too high, by the way.

 
No need for size with this on
No need for size with this one. The coloration is variable, but has a typical pattern and the two black lines of hairs on the eyes are a dead giveaway....

Moved
Moved from Syrphid Flies.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

This looks
like a female Eristalis tenax.

 
Thanks.
It certainly does. Seems like that curved third vein is a good clue for Eristalis. It would be the first of the species and even the subgenus for New Mexico.

I forgot to mention that I have pictures where the legs are in focus if that would help.

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