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Photo#598464
Thyreocoridae egg(s) perhaps - Corimelaena

Thyreocoridae egg(s) perhaps - Corimelaena
Sand Hill Prairie, Polk County, Iowa, USA
July 29, 2011
Size: .75 mm
I know, a confirmation on these eggs will be difficult.
I collected 3 adult Thyreocoridae at the BugGuide gathering_2011 but am just now looking at them. The bugs were in a vial of alcohol along with 4 small plant parts, 2 of which have eggs attached and 2 without eggs. There are 2 loose eggs as well. I can't quite imagine why I would have included plant parts in the vials unless they might have been stuck to the bugs.
gathering_2011

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Thyreocoridae egg(s) perhaps - Corimelaena Thyreocoridae egg(s) perhaps - Corimelaena Thyreocoridae egg, micropylar processes perhaps - Corimelaena Thyreocoridae egg, micropylar processes perhaps - Corimelaena

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Seems plausible
There is an illustration and description of the egg of Corimelaena incognita in this article:

"Length, 0.86 +/- 0.02; width, 0.41 +/- 0.01. Eggs laid singly; white at oviposition, becoming deep orange-red at maturation: chorion smooth, shiny, with faint longitudinal wrinkles; devoid of sculpturing or spines; 4-6 micropylar processes, forming ring at cephalic end; each process capitate, directed medially, somewhat flattened distally, ~0.05 mm long, opening subapically."

The micropylar processes are tiny, and I don't think they would show up at this magnification.

 
Can you tell?
I was able to get a copy of the article and these do look like micropylar processes. However there seem to be more than 6.

 
There do seem to be seven
The number may vary by species. They sure look like heteropteran eggs, and you have pretty good circumstantial evidence.

 
Oops
double posting, can't delete. Sorry

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