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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#598907
Machimus

Machimus
Whitepath Road area, Gilmer County, Georgia, USA
June 29, 2011
Confirmation / help needed before moving to final BG page. Looks like Machimus in general. Perhaps similar to this (also) late June Georgia Machimus fattigi on Giff's site. But also, compare to this very similar-looking (especially the legs) of this Machimus virginicus on Herschel's site. I cannot rule out Machimus notatus either (again because of legs and overall shape).

More help: Female?

Habitat was at 1600' in a mostly deciduous forest in the North Georgia Mountains about 20 miles south of Tennessee and North Carolina.

If one of these IDs is correct, this could be a Georgia data-point at the Genus or species level.

Images of this individual: tag all
Machimus Machimus Machimus

Moved
Moved from Robber Flies.

Machimus
I think you can get no closer that Machimus notatus/virginicus. It's not fattigi, as that species has reddish, not black femora. I don't know if there is a way to separate females of this species pair. If there is, I'd love to know about it.

 
Comments . . .
much appreciated. Thanks.

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