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Photo#600135
Jumping Spider - Messua limbata - female

Jumping Spider - Messua limbata - Female
San Benito, Cameron County, Texas, USA
November 24, 2011
South Texas always has something new for the naturalist. I thought this was a Zygoballus when I first saw it. Fortunately Wayne Maddison identified this jumper as Messua limbata and BugGuide had a good match with the Vincent images!

Images from video at:

images from video at:
Natural History Services - Jumping Spiders

Images of this individual: tag all
Jumping Spider - Messua limbata - female Jumping Spider - Messua limbata - female Jumping Spider - Messua limbata - female

..
Great additions, Dick. Are you sure about the gender, here? I can't see much of the pedipalpae, but the abdomen is so slender. (I imagine that you are right about this, but just thought I'd ask, anyway.)

 
Kevin . . .I'm glad you asked!
I added an image (this view shows on the video). Although images of males seem scarce the ones I can find do show relatively thin pedipalps but the chelicerae are large - Maddison (1996) describes the chelicerae as "elongate (and) divergent (Fig. 86, p.336).

 
We have 3 photos of males now
We have 3 photos of males now. As you can see, there is no confusion possible :)

 
Ryan - the images you refer to . . .
remind me how valuable BG is. Although I can read the words "elongate and divergent" over and over (without really getting it) there is a large and memorable AHA moment when I look at the images of the male posted on BG!

 
Brignoli
As the late arachnologist Paolo Brignoli wrote, "A long verbal description is usually a waste of space; it is far more important to publish good illustrations. A description not followed by an illustration is practically useless."

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