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TaxonomyBrowse
Info
ImagesLinksBooksData

Genus Muscina

Muscina stabulans - false stable fly? - Muscina stabulans - male House Fly - Muscina Muscina fly - Muscina levida muscid fly - Muscina prolapsa - female muscid fly - Muscina prolapsa - female Muscina prolapsa (Harris) - Muscina prolapsa muscid - Muscina stabulans
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon (Calyptratae)
Superfamily Muscoidea
Family Muscidae (House Flies and kin)
Subfamily Azeliinae
Tribe Reinwardtiini
Genus Muscina
Explanation of Names
Muscina Robineau-Desvoidy 1830
Numbers
Seven Nearctic species(1)
Size
Larger than a typical Muscidae
Identification
Key to species in(2)
Range
holarctic & neotropical(3); widespread in our area(1)
Habitat
variety of situations, incl. decomposing organic matter, fungi, carrion, and excrement(2)
Food
Larvae are highly polyphagous facultative carnivores(3) in part saprophagous, coprophagous, and zoophagous(2)
Remarks
Some members of this genus have medical and forensic significance, especially the cosmopolitan M. stabulans. Rare instances of human myiasis involving Muscina spp. have been reported.
Internet References
Works Cited
1.Manual of Nearctic Diptera Volume 2
Varies for each chapter; edited by J.F. McAlpine, B.V. Petersen, G.E. Shewell, H.J. Teskey, J.R. Vockeroth, D.M. Wood. 1987. Research Branch Agriculture Canada.
2.The Muscidae of California exclusive of subfamilies Muscinae and Stomoxyinae
H.C. Huckett. 1975. Bulletin of the California Insect Survey 18: 1-148.
3.Manual of Central American Diptera
Brian V. Brown et al. 2009. NRC Research Press.