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Photo#60167
Don't recognize family - Paranovelsis aequalis - male

Don't recognize family - Paranovelsis aequalis - Male
Nashua, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
June 27, 2006
Size: 3.5

Images of this individual: tag all
Don't recognize family - Paranovelsis aequalis - male Don't recognize family - Paranovelsis aequalis - male Don't recognize family - Paranovelsis aequalis - male Don't recognize family - Paranovelsis aequalis - male Don't recognize family - Paranovelsis aequalis - male

Dermestidae: Novelsis aequalis
I couldn't find this in the collection, so I forwarded one of the photos to Dick Beal, the long-retired but still active dermestid specialist for North America. This species used to be found only in the southern states but is moving north, with the northenmost previous record being Pennsylvania.

For such a goody I suppose the sneaker dinner could be passed over.

 
Thanks for tracking this down, Don.
I guess this is another New England record. I'm labeling vials this evening for you, to include this beetle for the UNH collection.

Dermestidae: Trogoderma sp.
Yum! I don't envy you in your dinner tonight.

 
Couldn't find these antennae on Web.
I did a google image search, looked at a number of Troderma species, and none had antennae like these. If this one has antennae that are unigue, it must be an easy beetle to key.

 
Keep it
for me please. The antennae can vary considerably in form between sexes in some genera of dermestids (such as Trogoderma), but I can't find a male with this antennal form in the collection, and it doesn't key out in Downie and Arnett. When I attempt to key it out using your pictures with the key in American Beetles, I end up with genera not known from this area. The antenna does look like an anobiid antenna, but I know of no genera that look like a Trogoderma (or Megatoma)

 
Should I postpone my sneaker dinner?
I've put it in alcohol after taking a bunch more pix of it. I have several others you requested as well and will try to get a shipment out Saturday.

 
What a surprise!
Those are some mighty impressive antlers for a dermestid. I'm thinking Sunday dinner. Give it time in the tenderizing marinade :-)

Maybe it's a dermestid?
Maybe it's a dermestid?

 
It so, it's conquering new heights
in der*mestid antenna design. I'll eat one of my sneakers if it is one :-)

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