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Species Dorcus brevis

Dorcus brevis - male Dorcus  - Dorcus brevis - male Stag Beetle - Dorcus brevis Dorcus brevis (Say) - Dorcus brevis - female Dorcus brevis  - Dorcus brevis - male Dorcus brevis female  - Dorcus brevis - female Coleoptera - Dorcus brevis Dorcus brevis - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
Suborder Polyphaga (Water, Rove, Scarab, Long-horned, Leaf and Snout Beetles)
Superfamily Scarabaeoidea (Scarab, Stag and Bess Beetles)
Family Lucanidae (Stag Beetles)
Subfamily Lucaninae
Tribe Lucanini
Genus Dorcus
Species brevis (Dorcus brevis)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Dorcus brevis (Say)
Orig. Comb: Lucanus brevis Say 1825
Numbers
One of two Dorcus species in North America.
Size
14-30 mm (1)(2)
Identification
Note "Humeral angles of elytra each with a large tooth projecting forward and outward":
  
Range
e US, especially the Piedmont.
Paulsen (2) records it from Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, New Jersey, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia, with additional records in older literature from Alabama, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, North Carolina, and Oklahoma.
Life Cycle
As with other lucanids, larvae feed on rotting wood.
Print References
Brimley, p. 209, lists for Piedmont and coastal plain of North Carolina: April-May, August-December (3).
Paulsen, M.J. 2010 Stag beetles of the genus Dorcus MacLeay in North America (Coleoptera, Lucanidae). In: Ratcliffe B, Krell F-T (eds.) Current advances in Scarabaeoidea research. ZooKeys 34: 199–207. (2)
Internet References
Stag Beetles of Oklahoma--keys from D. parallelus
Generic Guide to New World Scarbs--Dorcus brevis
Works Cited
1.The Beetles of Northeastern North America, Vol. 1 and 2.
Downie, N.M., and R.H. Arnett. 1996. The Sandhill Crane Press, Gainesville, FL.
2.Stag beetles of the genus Dorcus MacLeay in North America (Coleoptera, Lucanidae)
M.J Paulsen. 2010. ZooKeys 34: 199–207.
3.Insects of North Carolina
C.S. Brimley. 1938. North Carolina Department of Agriculture.