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TaxonomyBrowse
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Species Apheloria tigana

Genus or species? - Apheloria tigana Millipede Mania - Apheloria tigana millipede - Apheloria tigana Millipede -  - Apheloria tigana Millipede - Apheloria tigana Millipede - Apheloria tigana Millipede  Apheloria tigana - Apheloria tigana Boraria Stricta? - Apheloria tigana
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Myriapoda (Myriapods)
Class Diplopoda (Millipedes)
Order Polydesmida (Flat-backed Millipedes)
Family Xystodesmidae
Tribe Apheloriini
Genus Apheloria
Species tigana (Apheloria tigana)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
May be reclassified as a subspecies of Apheloria virginiensis.
Remarks
"Apheloria tigana is the dominant xystodesmid millipede in central North Carolina, particularly the "Triangle" (Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill region). Individuals typically have yellow paranota (lateral segmental expansions on the dorsa), a yellow middorsal spot on the anterior margin of the collum or 1st segment, and yellow middorsal spots on the caudalmost 3-5 segments. In central NC south of the Deep/Cape Fear Rivers there is a different and undescribed species with yellow middorsal splotches on essentially every segment." - Roland Shelley, North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences (from his comments on image below)