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Photo#606248
Spider Web - Leucauge argyra

Spider Web - Leucauge argyra
Sarasota County, Florida, USA
January 9, 2012
Size: Web diam about 6 inches
Found in evergreen ground cover, highlighted by morning dew.
Unusually precise design. The center formed a "peak"

Images of this individual: tag all
Spider Web - Leucauge argyra Spider Web - Leucauge argyra

Moved
Moved from Spiders. Thanks for the additional image. This will make a nice web shot for the guide page & my article on spider sign.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

orb-weaver
I think we should consider Larinia directa based on images I've seen of L. borealis webs. The Basilica orb-weaver makes a horizontal web that domes, but otherwise it doesn't look like your image above. One more to consider is Leucauge argyra. Other than that I don't have any other suggestions. Maybe someone else will recognize it.

I don't suppose you can go back & take a picture of the spider?

 
Adding picture
Here's a picture I took in the afternoon. I would eliminate the Larinia directa. This looks more like the Leucauge argyra.
Thanks, Lynette (I'm more of a photographer than an entomologist, and I appreciated the photos on your page, together with the bibliography on Macro.

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