Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Sponsor
The Coleopterists Society supports BugGuide.

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Discussion of 2018 gathering

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#6093
Abdominal structure of Grasshopper - Dichromorpha viridis - female

Abdominal structure of Grasshopper - Dichromorpha viridis - Female
Auburn, Alabama, USA
August 20, 2004
Can anyone explain the unusual structural nature of the abdomen on this grasshopper?

-
-

Moved

Dichromorpha viridis - I think
Nasty way to go. I sure wouldn't want to catch anything like what killed this one! It looks like it died freshly molted out of the last nymphal skin, since the wings are not spread, yet they are adult wings. It is female.

Fungus
I'd say it has succumbed to a fungal infection.

 
And check this
Apparently fungus is actually used to control grasshopper populations.

 
Fungal infections
Thanks Troy. Your references are most interesting reading. I tend to agree that this specimen has a microbial infection of some type.

 
Some reading
Here's an article which describes how a fungus infected an ant. Interesting reading.

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.