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Species Callirhytis quercusgemmaria

extrafloral nectaries? - Callirhytis quercusgemmaria Galls - Callirhytis quercusgemmaria ant with oak galls - Callirhytis quercusgemmaria galls on red oak - Callirhytis quercusgemmaria galls on red oak - Callirhytis quercusgemmaria Oak Stem Galls - Callirhytis quercusgemmaria Oak Stem Galls - Callirhytis quercusgemmaria Oak Stem Galls - Callirhytis quercusgemmaria
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon ("Parasitica" (parasitic Apocrita))
Superfamily Cynipoidea
Family Cynipidae (Gall Wasps)
Tribe Cynipini
Genus Callirhytis
Species quercusgemmaria (Callirhytis quercusgemmaria)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Cynips quercusgemmaria Ashmead 1885
Andricus gemmarius Ashmead 1885
Callirhytis gemmaria
Remarks
Causes detachable stem galls on "all the red oaks." (1)

Typical galls look like this; they secrete honeydew and drop to the ground when mature:


Galls containing "guests" do not drop. They enlarge and become woody, remaining on the tree over the winter. These galls were once described as an Andricus but the type specimens were all Synergus (inquilines). Weld's photo of these "guest"-containing galls looks much like the one below, but an adult Callirhytis emerged from these.
Works Cited
1.Cynipid Galls of the Eastern United States
Lewis H. Weld. 1959. Privately printed in Ann Arbor, Michigan.