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Photo#611398
Parasitoid - Eurydinoteloides - male

Parasitoid - Eurydinoteloides - Male
Rotonda West, Charlotte County, Florida, USA
June 11, 2011
Size: 2 mm
Taken in yellow pan trap, between 5.VI.2011 and 16.VI.2011.

Tarsi 5-segmented.

I think it is a male as there is a short, flat, wide, process extending from the abdomen rather than a sharp ovipositor.

Images of this individual: tag all
Parasitoid - Eurydinoteloides - male Parasitoid - Eurydinoteloides Parasitoid - Eurydinoteloides

neat addition --thanks again, colleagues.
Moved from Pteromalids.

This is a male of the genus E
This is a male of the genus Eurydinoteloides Girault (Pteromalidae: Pteromalinae). The genus is quite speciose in the New World. One of the distinquishing features is the conspicuous white setae on the head and mesosoma, though some other genera share the same feature.

Moved

Pteromalid…
Fits this family including the the 6-segmented funicle, wing venation, a large thorax, tarsi as mentioned, a short pronotum, and a wide mesoscutum.

See reference here.

 
thks
I wonder if its the male of the other one I posted. They share some similar traits.

 
Maybe...
They do look morphologically similar, and a male may have been attracted to a female that had previously arrived at a trap.

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