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Photo#619072
Grasshopper with short wings - Chloealtis conspersa - female

Grasshopper with short wings - Chloealtis conspersa - Female
Atlantic Mine, Houghton County, Michigan, USA
July 31, 2011
Found this grasshopper on our garage floor last summer. I'm not sure whether it is a short-winged adult, or a nymph with long wing pads.

Images of this individual: tag all
Grasshopper with short wings - Chloealtis conspersa - female Grasshopper with short wings - Chloealtis conspersa - female Grasshopper with short wings - Chloealtis conspersa - female

She is a short-winged adult of Chloealtis conspersa

 
Thank you.
I'd been having trouble finding this one in "Orthoptera of Michigan", and now I see why: the book only has a photograph of the male, and I didn't realize the females didn't have the black patch on the sides of the thorax.

 
You're welcome
It's not unusual for the females and males of a species to look very different, and it's not unusual for the color and pattern to vary strikingly from one individual to another even within the same gender. Field guide type books rarely have enough room to show more than one or two illustrations of a species, but sometimes I think they need to make more of an effort to describe individual variation, and to illustrate very different looking males and females.

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