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Photo#61963
Sawfly larva

Sawfly larva
Osborn Park, Erie County, Ohio, USA
July 1, 2006
Anybody seen one like this before?

Frassed

Is this the only photo or are
Is this the only photo or are there others? Need a top view. Or maybe you remember if the larva had very convex glands (looking like un hammered nails) on the sides of the body?

 
I definitely did not take a t
I definitely did not take a top view shot, sorry. I do not recall anything unusual like the glands you describe, but it has been a long time.

 
Yes, I understand that it was
Yes, I understand that it was a long time ago. But I think you would remember that. These glands are not visible from the side, but they are clearly visible from above.
I will show an example
http://insectamo.ru/sawfly/25-pililshchiki/3886-sterictiphora-geminata

 
My impression is that it had
My impression is that it had a very smooth body, but I could be wrong. Those are some tiny little glands. There does appear to be some sort of swelling underneath the spiracles.

 
Tenthredinoidea
Yes, its "become visible" when it is clear where to look :)
And it also seems that the larva has cerci on the last segment ... but not clearly, unfortunately.
I would stay at Tenthredinoidea, possibly Argidae, Sterictiphorinae.

Moved

Cropping
This image needs croppping. Please read this article.

 
Better?
:)

 
Wider view of leaf?
Now that you have cropped the photo around the insect...do you have a wider view of the leaf or plant? If so, I might be able to identify the plant, which could help identify the insect.

 
Ash?
I was able to find the original photo, linked to this one. Feel free to frass it once you're done, since you're an editor.

 
Ash
Ash (Fraxinus) has compound leaves whose leaflets have a finely toothed margin; your photo shows these features, so combined with your tentative ID, I am willing say that's what it is. There are several species, but yours appears to have fairly broad leaflets, so might be white ash (F. americana) or green ash (F. pennsylvanica). Both of these are common in Ohio.

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