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Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

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Species Muscina stabulans

Muscina stabulans - false stable fly? - Muscina stabulans - male Muscina stabulans - false stable fly? - Muscina stabulans - male Muscina stabulans - false stable fly? - Muscina stabulans - male fly - Muscina stabulans false stable fly - Muscina stabulans - female muscid - Muscina stabulans muscid - Muscina stabulans muscid - Muscina stabulans
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Diptera (Flies)
No Taxon (Calyptratae)
Superfamily Muscoidea
Family Muscidae (House Flies and kin)
Subfamily Azeliinae
Tribe Reinwardtiini
Genus Muscina
Species stabulans (Muscina stabulans)
Explanation of Names
Musca stabulans Fallén 1823
Identification
Tibiae yellow, second segment of antennae mostly dark.
Range
Cosmopolitan
Remarks
"Adults are known to frequent buildings for animal and human habitation in serach of food, shelter, and for oviposition. The flies are commonly found in the presence of tainted food or decomposing organic matter. Larvae have been bred from blemished or partly decayed fruits and vegetables, various fungi, animal dung, human excreta, carrion, nests of starlings, sparrows, swallows, and from dead snails and earthworms. They have been recorded as parasites or predators on a wide variety of insects in the immature stages, belonging to the orders Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Orthopera, Diptera, and Coleoptera."(1)
Internet References