Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

Interested in a 2022 BugGuide gathering in New Mexico?

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Previous events


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#631134
Very small mantis - Dicromantispa interrupta

Very small mantis - Dicromantispa interrupta
Punta gorda History Park, Charlotte County, Florida, USA
April 18, 2012
Size: 1.25 inches
Flew by me as I was shooting a Great Horned Owl. I originally thought it was a paper wasp. On the plant, it looked like a bit of dead leaf.

Images of this individual: tag all
Very small mantis - Dicromantispa interrupta Very small mantis - Dicromantispa interrupta Very small mantis - Dicromantispa interrupta Very small mantis - Dicromantispa interrupta

Moved
Moved from Dicromantispa sayi.

When I first scrutinized this series, the following items made me suspect D. interrupta:

    1) the lengthy extent of the darkened amber edges of the wings (i.e. all the way to the apex);
    2) the general pattern of coloration (relatively uniform yellow); and...especially...
    3) the characteristic darkened brownish "knot" at the cross-vein 2ra-rp (somewhat blurry in this post, but compare with the thumbnails below):



The one anomaly seemed to be the lack of a "break" in the amber wings edges just beyond the pterostigma...which is typical (and one might assume characteristic) of D. interrupta, and the presumed origin of the specific epithet.

However, in reading the detailed description of D. interrupta, starting on pg. 257 of Hoffman(1), the agreement with this specimen was excellent. And the coup-de-grâce was one of the final remarks in that description (at the bottom of pg. 260):

    "Specimens from peninsular Florida often have the reddish-brown mark at the wing apex extended basally to the pterostigma"

Moved
Moved from Mantidflies.

Moved for expert attention
Moved from ID Request.

Dicromantispa sp.
Dicromantispa sayi possibly?

mantis fly indeed
...see them every time I go to FL. At least you see great horned owls. I haven't seen or heard one in over a decade. Barred owls and schreech owls galore, no clue as to where the great horns went. ok , i am done being off topic now. Sorry :)

Mantidflies (Mantispidae)
hope you were shooting the owl with a camera..:-)

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.