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Photo#631280
Round with a hole in it - Amphibolips

Round with a hole in it - Amphibolips
Boxborough, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
Size: 33 mm diameter
Photo taken April 18, 2012

Images of this individual: tag all
Round with a hole in it - Amphibolips Guts - Amphibolips

Moved
Moved from Unidentified Galls.
It's a blackish oak; maybe John Pearson can ID it more specifically.

 
Black Oak
IDed as Black Oak (Quercus velutina).

 
Found nearby
Within 20 meters of this wasp from a year ago:

 
Want the gall?
If you want the gall I can check if it's still there.

 
If you find more without exit holes in them...
I would definitely like some. I think this is one of the "spongy" oak apples, and the literature isn't clear about how they differ, so I need to rear some adults to sort them out. Look for them after the leaves have emerged, since they are modified leaves. Adults will emerge between late spring and early fall, depending on what species they are.

If you do see this particular one again, you could cut it open and get a shot of the inside (to verify "spongy" vs. "empty") and get an approximate diameter to improve the chances of eventually getting a species ID.

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