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Photo#634678
Wingless wasp, Chalcidoidea, Eupelimidae, Eupelmus? - Brasema leucothysana - female

Wingless wasp, Chalcidoidea, Eupelimidae, Eupelmus? - Brasema leucothysana - Female
Chamblee, DeKalb County, Georgia, USA
April 28, 2012
Size: ca. 3mm body

Images of this individual: tag all
Wingless wasp, Chalcidoidea, Eupelimidae, Eupelmus? - Brasema leucothysana - female Wingless wasp, Chalcidoidea, Eupelimidae, Eupelmus? - Brasema leucothysana - female

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

wingless wasp
The family identification of Eupelmidae is correct, but it is a female of Brasema leucothysana. There are various technical differences between Eupelmus and Brasema I won't bore you with, but females of this species are actually quite easy to recognize and both of your pictures captured the most distinctive feature. Note that the antennae appear white near the base of the flagellum. This is because three segments of the flagellum have dense white setae that are highly reflective. The male of the species remains unknown, but won't look anything like the female.

 
So fascinating!
Thank you, very much! Your monograph on the Eupelminae is most informative. Reported from Sapelo Island and Lake Herrick in Georgia, I am fortunate to have observed a linear speck on the side of my house! http://www.nhm.ac.uk/resources/research-curation/projects/chalcidoids/pdf_X/Gibson995b.pdf

Eupelmid…
Fits the characteristics of the family - not sure beyond that. The genus Eupelmus does include wingless individuals. Pls indicate approx. length if you can recall it.

See reference here.

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