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Photo#64591
Unknown - Magicicada septendecim

Unknown - Magicicada septendecim
Wompatuck State Park, Hingham, Massachusetts, USA
June 30, 2006
Size: the hole was about 1/2"
Location: Wompatuck State Park, Hingham, MA. 6/30/06
My 3 year old spied this critter in its hole made on the rocky trail. Park rangers thought it might be an ant lion larvae, but I cannot find any photos to confirm that. Another bug-friend thinks it might be some type of wasp. I admit to not having the courage to dislodge it from its burrow.

Images of this individual: tag all
Unknown - Magicicada septendecim Unknown - Magicicada septendecim Unknown - Magicicada septendecim Unknown - Magicicada septendecim

Moved
Moved from Cicadas.

Moved

Cicada
I would say it is the nymph of a cicada. Never seen one myself, except for the shed exoskeleton of the last stage.
Here is a shot of an exuvium:

 
With those red eyes, it might
With those red eyes, it might even be one of the 17-year cicadas. It's a good thing you didn't pry it out: those front legs pinch hard!

 
It is a cicada nymph. I used
It is a cicada nymph. I used to find them like this all the time growing up in the midwest. Once they make that hole they are about to emerge to molt into adults. You can pry them out. They can't hurt you.

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