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Photo#649681
Sara Orangetip - Anthocharis julia - male

Sara Orangetip - Anthocharis julia - Male
Umatilla National Forest, 5000 feet ele. South of Pilot Rock, Oregon, Umatilla County, Oregon, USA
May 30, 2012
Size: 30-33mm wing span
I do not know the difference between sara and sara sara. I just thought it was a neat picture.

Images of this individual: tag all
Sara Orangetip - Anthocharis julia - male Sara Orangetip - Anthocharis julia - male Sara Orangetip - Anthocharis julia - male

Sorry I took so long to put it under the species
and subspecies. I hadn't looked at these in quite some time. Most books don't list this subspecies yet, it's use is relatively recent.

And I agree - it is a neat picture.

 
I have two more pictures
I took more pics of this individual but only posted one. I would like to put them with this one. They add more views for ID. Is that OK?

 
Personally
I would tend to encourage it, as long as they are decent pictures and show at least somewhat different views from the first one.

We don't have many pictures of these yet. Not sure why. They fly at a time when people are usually itching to get outside after the long winter. [The local version is flying right now here; and, admittedly, I'm guilty of not having photographed them yet myself.]

 
It is common
Up in the Blue Mountains I see quite a few in late May and early June. Then...no more.

Moved
Moved from Orangetips.

 
Thanks David,
I wondered where this fit in with the others.

Moved

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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