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Photo#657934
Crab spider - Coriarachne brunneipes - female

Crab spider - Coriarachne brunneipes - Female
Cowichan Valley, British Columbia, Canada
June 14, 2012
Size: ~11mm body length
Found on the deck. Genus Coriarachne or Bassaniana (family Thomisidae) perhaps?

On the Coriarachne info page it says:

From Rod Crawford: "This is either Coriarachne brunneipes or Bassaniana utahensis. The key feature is whether the large setae on the carapace have pointed ends (Coriarachne) or blunt ends (Bassaniana)"

The ends look pointed to me, as shown in the close-up images of the head area, so I'm thinking Coriarachne is likely?

Images of this individual: tag all
Crab spider - Coriarachne brunneipes - female Crab spider - Coriarachne brunneipes - female Crab spider - Coriarachne brunneipes - female Crab spider - Coriarachne brunneipes - female Crab spider - Coriarachne brunneipes - female

I agree, nice photos & Coriarachne
Moved from Spiders.

It does look like Coriarachne
Lynette will know since she sees Coriarachne fairly often.

Nice photo's with great detail
I'll leave the I.D. up to the experts. This site provides a good Thomisidae key;
http://research.amnh.org/iz/blackrock2/families/thomisidae.htm

 
Thanks
Link looks great, thanks.

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