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Photo#659793
long tail dance fly - Rhamphomyia longicauda - female

long tail dance fly - Rhamphomyia longicauda - Female
jackson, jackson County, Michigan, USA
June 14, 2012

Images of this individual: tag all
long tail dance fly - Rhamphomyia longicauda - female long tail dance fly - Rhamphomyia longicauda - female long tail dance fly - Rhamphomyia longicauda - male - female

Images
Dear porter,

These images you've taken of Rhamphomyia are lovely - would it be possible for me to include them in a TEDx talk I'm giving soon? If so, let me know and I can send you some details.

Many thanks

James

 
reply to your request
TEDx huh? i got your message, thank you. i would like the details of your intended use of these images. tell me what is your talk about? if you can tell me more about this fly would be great.

 
tedx
Of course! The talk is about the evolution of odd insect mating strategies.

Rhamphomyia have a very bizarre mating system where the females get all of their food from males in exchange for matings. Males carrying food are in short supply, so in this case it is the females that must compete for males. The males prefer to give their food parcels to the biggest female (which in insects usually signals they have the most eggs). To beat the other females and get more food, the females have evolved a system where they deceive the males by inflating themselves to look as big as possible - hence the inflatable pouches in your photos! You can find more information in the following paper:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347299913106

I'd like to use the images in a slide where I describe this mating system. Naturally I would credit you in full in some text at the bottom of the photo. It's not a commercial talk and I'm not making any profit by it, so in licence terms it would fall under "non-commercial reuse". Because it's TEDx, it'll be up on the web as a video, and I will gladly send you the link once it's up.

Do let me know - my email is just my bugguide username at gmail.com.

Cheers!

James

 
TEDx event
good reply, thank you. i've sent you an email.

Moved
Moved from Empidinae.

great shot
that is a great shot of swarming females!
I have collected this species but actually never seen the swarming behavior.

Moved
Moved from Flies.

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

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