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Photo#665714
Horse Fly - Atylotus - female

Horse Fly - Atylotus - Female
Ballston Lake, Saratoga County, New York, USA
June 29, 2012
Size: ~ 11 mm
It was collected from a leaf on a black locust tree. It was rather sluggish, I was able to capture it without a net. ID help appreciated.

Images of this individual: tag all
Horse Fly - Atylotus - female Horse Fly - Atylotus - female Horse Fly - Atylotus - female Horse Fly - Atylotus - female Horse Fly - Atylotus - female Horse Fly - Atylotus - female Horse Fly - Atylotus - female

Moved
Moved from Horse and Deer Flies. Tom is right

 
Thanks, Tom and Keith.
Is it safe to assume it's a female because the eyes don't touch?

 
yes
there are very few male horse flies with medially separated eyes (some Afrotropical Philoliche, some south american pangoniines, maybe some others that I don't know about)

 
Chrysops
Males of some western Chrysops have narrowly separated eyes, but the inner margins are curved rather than parallel as in females.

Nice one Karl
The yellow eyes remind me of an Atylotus sp., but wait for someone who really knows Tabanids.

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