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TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#667476
Is this a moth? - Chrysendeton medicinalis

Is this a moth? - Chrysendeton medicinalis
near Sardinia, Brown County, Ohio, USA
July 1, 2012
Size: very tiny

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

Congrats! A first for Ohio.

Yes it is.Bold Medicine Mot
Yes it is.
Bold Medicine Moth -- Chrysendeton medicinalis
bg record for Ohio too.

 
Thank you for your ID. Maybe
Thank you for your ID. Maybe you can help me out with others. I have posted multiple moths and other bugs lately requesting an ID and there is no answer. I have been keeping inventory of the flora and fauna of the family farm since 1990 by photo and excel spreadsheet. Having discovered bugguide and Peterson's new Field Guide to Moths of NE US and watching all the moths and bugs that come to the painted white sides of the farmhouse when I turn the lights on after dark has brought me many new bugs to ID. How do I get the answers to the photos I have posted on BG. If it were a bad photo, I could understand or even an "I don't know" would at least let me know that someone looked. I'd be glad to tell you the numbers of the posts or whatever it is I need to do to get them IDd. Once again, thanks, Mary Jo White

 
Frustration?
You are not alone – I have addressed the matter of seemingly ignored posts some time ago on the Forum (here). Browsing posted images from of 5 or more years ago I realized that on those early days there was much back-and-forth among the contributors as each of them tried to learn. I suppose BugGuide now suffers from its increasing popularity and, in the wake of the overwhelming number of posts, many early contributors may have lost their initial enthusiasm to communicate. I have adjusted to this reality and try to do moth identifications myself, using the web and Beadle and Leckie’s excellent book. I am getting better at it and learned a lot in the process. When despair takes over, I post on BugGuide and wait for a surprise. Actually, one can still count on very helpful BugGuide subscribers. Regarding my expectations, I know now which types of moths are unlikely to be identified to the species level (or even genus) from photographs. And, being aware of contributors’ impatience, I have become bold enough to make suggestions on posts I look at if I think I can. So, I moved beyond my frustration, and you will too. Maybe you already have!

 
Keep Shooting
I went through the same frustrations when I started on Bug Guide. What did I do? I just kept shooting'n'posting. Now, more than 4 years and 6,175 images later, I still have 135 moth noids (no ID). Occasionally, I will review to see what I can recognize, now. This Bark Beetle just got ID'd today, 17 months after I posted.
- See more advice below -

 
Moth ID's
Peter, Mary & Candice,
We have had a large influx of contributors this year, which means ID Request has gone from an average 15-20 pages to 85-90. I only use ID Request for something I haven't a clue. To increase the odds of getting more ID'd:

1. Post at the lowest level you're sure of, but at very least post in Moths.

2. Crop photo to just the moth, with dorsal view facing up and lateral view facing right. This makes easier for comparing with other photos and written descriptions.

3. If you think you know what the moth is or what it's close to, include the Hodges #. This cuts down on the ID time. It really helps when working from an I-phone.

4. When you get an ID, move to guide page.

Hope this helps.
Robert

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