Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

BugGuide is a National Moth Week Partner. How to add your National Moth Week 2021 photos. July 17-25.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Previous events


TaxonomyBrowseInfoImagesLinksBooksData
Photo#67344
Cerambycidae - Neoclytus mucronatus

Cerambycidae - Neoclytus mucronatus
Bellevue, Sarpy County, Nebraska, USA
July 28, 2006
Size: approx. 3/4"
We think this might be a cricket, but we searched crickets on Bug Guide & our references and can't find any matches. Please help. Thanks,
Babs & Loren Padelford
Bellevue, NE

Images of this individual: tag all
Cerambycidae - Neoclytus mucronatus Cerambycidae - Neoclytus mucronatus

Moved

flying crickets
Just wanted to add that many crickets can indeed fly, but they don't have the hard bodies and front wings of a beetle. I'd be curious to know if this beetle can actually use those big hind legs to jump, or if they are just for appearances?

Moved
Moved from Longhorned Beetles.

Neoclytus
comment from Gianfranco Sama: the depicted Cerambycid beetle belongs to the subfamily Cerambycinae, tribe Clytini, probably genus Neoclytus

This one tricked you. It is a
This one tricked you. It is a longhorn beetle (Cermabycidae) and he wants to look like something else...with success

 
Thanks Martin!
We were a bit suspicious because it would have had to fly to get to the birdfeeder where we photographed it. We appreciate your help.

Loren and Babs Padelford
Bellevue, NE

Comment viewing options
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click 'Save settings' to activate your changes.