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Photo#6763
Spider Wasp - Entypus unifasciatus - female

Spider Wasp - Entypus unifasciatus - Female
Greenwood County, South Carolina, USA
September 5, 2004
I found this wasp dragging a dead/immobilized wolf spider across my garage floor. I assume the wasp killed the spider, but it could have possibly found it already dead. The wasp was fairly fast in dragging the spider, with the wasp pulling backwards. It even would pull the spider up vertical surfaces.

It was not a cooperative photographic subject and I think it thought I was trying to take the spider away, because on a few occasions it dropped the spider and flew at me until I backed away.

I have another couple shots from different angles but they don't seem to reveal any other details about the wasp.

Moved

Spider Wasp
I found one of these last night in my backyard dragging a similarly sized wolf and making good progress through the grass. What caught my attention were the yellow antennae that were very active. We gave it a good berth but it was on a mission so it probably wasn't going to bother us if we left it alone. I'm glad I found this site!! I have it bookmarked for future reference!! THANK YOU!!!

Spider wasp, Entypus unifasciatus
Fantastic! This is the species I was hoping to get photos of for the field guide! Way to go! The orange antennae and orange patch on the wingtips make this an easy ID. Plus, they are quite large wasps. They are pretty common in the eastern U.S. and I'm surprised other folks on bugguide have not photographed them. This one has paralyzed a wolf spider.

 
Moved to guide, female?
Nifty. Moved to a guide page. I'll be on the lookout for this one.

This is a female, correct?

Patrick Coin
Durham, North Carolina

 
Thanks
Eric: thanks for the ID.
Patrick: thanks for the Info page.

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