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Photo#679283
Katydid Eggs hatched - Microcentrum

Katydid Eggs hatched - Microcentrum
saguarosam County, Utah, USA
March 1, 2012
Size: 6.3mm
Was taking some representative shots of the maple tree in our yard. I found these on the underside of one of the branches. I knew they were eggs but couldn't id them. I tried hatching them. Nothing came of that. Except the tiny perfectly placed and sized holes they larva? ate to get out. When I took some macro pictures, you can even see the shavings by each hole. What I find amazing though not unexpected is how perfectly symmetrical each egg is and each hole is. Today, we id'd a Broad-winged Katydid, Microcentrum oblongifolia, in National Wildlife Federation Insect field guide. The inset picture showed these exact eggs and described them perfectly. My grandson and I were quite excited as I wouldn't have thought of Katydids laying eggs on a maple tree.

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Katydid Eggs hatched - Microcentrum Katydid Eggs hatched - Microcentrum

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Parasitoid Holes
The holes you are seeing are actually the emergence holes of wasps that parasitize the eggs of katydids. The wasps produce these circular holes to escape the confines of the egg in which they develop. When a katydid hatches it splits the side of the egg open. I know wasps in the genus Anastatus (Eupelmidae) and Baryconus (Scelionidae) attack katydid eggs having reared some myself.

 
Katydid wasp parasites
Thanks for the info. That makes more sense. I double-checked the time/date of the photos. It was in March. Though it was warm in SLC this year, that seems very early for the emergence of the wasp. Is this the "usual" time for emergence? Or a climate change this year?
Do you know if the hatchlings are for Katydid larva? Or immature Katydids?