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Discussion of 2018 gathering

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Photos of insects and people from the 2012 gathering in Alabama

Photos of insects and people from the 2011 gathering in Iowa

Photos from the 2010 Workshop in Grinnell, Iowa

Photos from the 2009 gathering in Washington

TaxonomyBrowse
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Genus Macremphytus

larva - Macremphytus tarsatus Sawfly Larva? - Macremphytus testaceus Sawfly larvae? on red osier dogwood tree - Macremphytus testaceus Larva on Cornus racemosa - Macremphytus testaceus Dogwood Invaders Invasive? - Macremphytus tarsatus sawfly - Macremphytus testaceus - female Caterpillar - Macremphytus tarsatus Macremphytus testaceus
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Hymenoptera (Ants, Bees, Wasps and Sawflies)
No Taxon ("Symphyta" - Sawflies, Horntails, and Wood Wasps)
Family Tenthredinidae (Common Sawflies)
Subfamily Allantinae
Tribe Allantini
Genus Macremphytus
Explanation of Names
Macremphytus MacGillivray 1908
Numbers
4 spp., all in our area(1)
Identification
Larvae start out covered with a powdery waxy white coating, which they shed later in the year to become yellow with black cross-stripes or spots on top.

D.R. Smith on distinguishing the larvae: The larva of M. semicornis is not known; larvae of M. lovetti and M. testaceus are very similar. Larvae of the two common eastern species can be separated as follows:
M. tarsatus: both the feeding stages and prepupal stage have a rectangular black mark on each segment.

M. testaceus: the feeding stages are uniformly green (no black marks), though the whitish bloom may make them look white.

Color changes when molting to the prepupal stage; there are black spots on the body (not the rectangular pattern as in tarsatus).
Range
M. lovetti Pacific Northwest; M. semicornis e. Canada & ne. US; M. testaceus and M. tarsatus in e. US & Canada
Life Cycle
Larvae bore into wood in fall to pupate and overwinter. In wild conditions this would normally be dead wood on the ground, but they have also adapted to bore into man-made structures. Dave Smith has reared them by giving them corks to bore into.