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Species Catocala praeclara - Praeclara Underwing - Hodges#8865

Erebidae: Catocala praeclara - Catocala praeclara Praeclara Underwing - Catocala praeclara Catocala praeclara - Praeclara Underwing - Catocala praeclara Praeclara Underwing #2? - Catocala praeclara Praeclara Underwing #2? - Catocala praeclara Catocala praeclara Catocala praeclara Catocala sp. - Catocala praeclara
Show images of: caterpillars · adults · both
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Hexapoda (Hexapods)
Class Insecta (Insects)
Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies and Moths)
Superfamily Noctuoidea (Owlet Moths and kin)
Family Erebidae
Subfamily Erebinae
Tribe Catocalini
Genus Catocala (Underwings)
Species praeclara (Praeclara Underwing - Hodges#8865)
Hodges Number
8865
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Catocala praeclara Grote & Robinson, 1866 (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6)
Explanation of Names
Specific epithet from Latin meaning "very bright," for the "anterior wings lustrous, evenly and nearly entirely covered with pale cinereous and greenish scales which have a bright reflection." (1)
Size
Wingspan 3.8-5.0 cm. (7)
Identification
A medium-size moth with dull greenish or purple grey forewings. The antemedial line is black and distinct, the other cross-lines less so, mainly indicated by dark marks at the costa. The basal dash is indistinct or absent. A short dark dash in the outer fold, with some dark red-brown scaling adjacent. The hindwings are bright yellow-orange, with a median black band that forms a long loop with the basal streak. A wider black terminal band, divided or nearly so in the anal area, forming a dark, anal spot. The antennae are simple and both the sexes are alike. It can only be mistaken with Catocala blandula, which has much more mottled grey, black and whitish forewings. Canadian populations, which are darker and duller than more southern ones, were previously treated as a separate species, Catocala manitoba (Beut). (7)
Range
Primarily eastern, from Nova Scotia west to southeastern Alberta, south to Florida and Kansas. (7)
Lectotype female: New York. (8)
Habitat
Dry shrub stands in the valleys of the grassland region. (7)
Season
Adults fly August and September.
Food
E.H. Strickland Museum lists chokeberry (Aronia Rosaceae) and plum (Prunus Rosaceae) (7), HOSTS lists only leadplant (Amorpha canescens Fabaceae) (9), Bill Oehlke lists chokeberry and juneberry. (10)
Life Cycle
Adults are nocturnal and come to light and probably sugar baits (no data). Larvae are solitary defoliators and the egg is the overwintering stage. There is a single annual brood. (7)
Print References
Barnes, Wm. & J.H. McDunnough, 1918. Illustrations of the North American species of the genus Catocala. Memoirs of the AMNH 2(1): p.41; Pl.9, f.32. (5)
Grote, A.R. & C.T. Robinson, 1866. Lepidopterological notes and descriptions - no. 2. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Philadelphia 6: 25; Pl.4, f.4. (1)
Works Cited
1.Lepidopterological notes and descriptions - no. 2.
Augustus Radcliffe Grote & Coleman T. Robinson. 1866. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Philadelphia 6: 1-30, Pl.3,4.
2.On the North American species of Catocala.
Augustus Radcliffe Grote. 1872. Transactions of the American Entomological Society 4: 1-20.
3.The genus Catocala.
George. D. Hulst. 1884. Bulletin of the Brooklyn Entomological Society 7(1): 14-56.
4.Notes on the life histories of North American Catocalae, with descriptions of two new forms.
T.D. Mayfield. 1922. Bulletin of the Brooklyn Entomological Society 17: 114-120, 138-142.
5.Illustrations of the North American species of the genus Catocala.
William Barnes, James Halliday McDunnough. 1918. Memoirs of the AMNH 2(1).
6.Systematics of moths in the genus Catocala (Lepidoptera, Erebidae) IV. Nomenclatorial stabilization of the ....
Lawrence Gall, David Hawks. 2010. Zookeys 39: 37-83.
7.University of Alberta Entomology Collection
8.Systematics of moths in the genus Catocala (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). III.
Gall, Lawrence F. & David C. Hawks. 2002. Journal of the Lepidopterists' Society. 56(4): 234-264.
9.HOSTS - The Hostplants and Caterpillars Database
10.Bill Oehlke's North American Catocala
11.North American Moth Photographers Group