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Photo#686579
Unknown moth  - Anania hortulata

Unknown moth - Anania hortulata
Mission (49.1337° N, 122.3112° W), British Columbia, Canada
July 27, 2012
Size: wingspan approx 5 cm (1")
I've had these fly into the house in the evening & they always aim for the ceiling & rarely move afterwards (though I never can find them later).

Moved
Moved from ID Request.

 
Moving Images?
Thanks for moving this.

David, who can decide to move an image? The person posting or just admin? I've left my photos in I'd Request as I didn't know what else to do with them even after others have confirmed the species

On a somewhat related topic, should I post photos I've taken of a pretty common species even if the photos are sharp & focused? I understand frasse to be for poorer quality photos. Should I be putting any of my photos there or does admin move them there.

And yes, I read the article on guidelines for posting images :) & understood it but rapidly got bogged down on all the following comments other members made.

Small magpie moth
Anania hortulata (Crambidae). See here.

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