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Photo#688634
weevil - Cryptorhynchus fuscatus - female

weevil - Cryptorhynchus fuscatus - Female
Groton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, USA
August 9, 2012
Size: 8 mm

Images of this individual: tag all
weevil - Cryptorhynchus fuscatus - female weevil - Cryptorhynchus fuscatus - female

Cryptorhynchus fuscatus LeConte, female
Moved from Cryptorhynchus obliquus. I'm fairly sure now these are just large Cryptorhynchus fuscatus.

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Moved from Cryptorhynchus helvus. I now believe this is C. obliquus. Didn't really look like C. helvus, not sure what I was thinking.

Cryptorhynchus helvus LeConte
Moved from Cryptorhynchus fuscatus. Thanks to -v- for sending me Robert Anderson's revision. The specimen, now a photo-voucher, is somewhat worn, which makes it a bit tricky. But the key characters for C. helvus are present (single small distal tooth on front femora; shiny impunctate spots over the eyes; dark setae at base of intervals 3 & 5) plus the large size (about 8 mm) make me believe this is C. helvus. Appears to be a female, so I did not dissect. Tom, nice find, appears to be a new state record for MA (previously reported as close as NY).
Also want to note that the pronotal setae are a little odd, as C. helvus should have uniformly appressed scales, but there are small lateral patches of dark erect setae which make it look like C. fuscatus.

Moved

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