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Family Halonoproctidae - Cork-lid trapdoor spiders

Ravine Trapdoor Spider - Cyclocosmia truncata - female spider unknown - Cyclocosmia truncata - male mygalomorph spider from sandhill habitat - Ummidia Missouri trapdoor spider - Ummidia - male Trapdoor spider - Ummidia - female
Classification
Kingdom Animalia (Animals)
Phylum Arthropoda (Arthropods)
Subphylum Chelicerata (Chelicerates)
Class Arachnida (Arachnids)
Order Araneae (Spiders)
Infraorder Mygalomorphae (Mygalomorphs)
Family Halonoproctidae (Cork-lid trapdoor spiders)
Synonyms and other taxonomic changes
Genera in our range formerly placed in Ctenizidae transferred to Halonoproctidae in Godwin et al., 2018(1)
Explanation of Names
Pocock, 1901
Size
10 - 30 mm
Remarks
"Trapdoor spiders" because they make their homes in tubelike burrows completely lined with silk. They cut a lid which is attached on one side, like a hinged trapdoor. The top of the lid is camouflaged with debris. When they feel the vibration of prey, they rush out to capture it, then return to the burrow. Females rarely leave their burrows, but males may be found wandering in search of prey.
Print References
Spiders and Their Kin(2)
Works Cited
1.Phylogeny of a cosmopolitan family of morphologically conserved trapdoor spiders (Mygalomorphae, Ctenizidae) using Anchored Hybr
Godwin, R. L., Opatova, V., Garrison, N. L., Hamilton, C. A. & Bond, J. E. . 2018. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 126: 303-313.
2.Spiders and Their Kin: A Golden Guide from St. Martin's Press
Herbert W. Levi, Lorna R. Levi, Nicholas Strekalovsky. 2001. St. Martin's Press.